Communication is Essential in a Crisis

communicating with one another

by Aggie Perilli

At a recent gathering of women professionals, an associate asked me to address why communication is especially vital in a crisis, when some might be tempted to turn a blind eye in the hope that no one will notice.

I thought of Johnson & Johnson’s 1982 recall of Extra-Strength Tylenol after seven people died from ingesting capsules that had been criminally tainted with cyanide.

Following this unthinkable crime, Tylenol’s 37 percent of the $1.2 billion analgesic market dropped to 7 percent and marketers predicted that the brand would never recover.