Inspiring a World of Difference


Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it,
and if I were a bird I would fly
about the earth seeking the successive autumns.
– GEORGE ELIOT

CarolineDesign-Madison-02

Photograph by Caroline Dahlmanns

Aggie Perilli Communications International (APCI) creates award-winning communications, marketing, and information campaigns for non-profit and for-profit interests and organizations. From strategy through customer tracking, APCI engages and aligns your audience to realize your vision while inspiring a world of difference.

Among APCI’s integrated full-service offerings are:

Campaign Nonviolence Advances 1,600+ Peacemaking Actions

Over 1,600 marches, prayer vigils, festivals, and other events took place from September 16 to 24, 2017, across the United States and worldwide, as part of Campaign Nonviolence’s fourth annual “Week of Actions.” These actions culminated on September 21, the International Day of Peace. Thousands participated in this unprecedented grassroots campaign to build a culture of peace free from racism, war, poverty, and environmental destruction.

Said Dr. Ken Butigan, cofounder of Campaign Nonviolence and professor at DePaul University, “People across the United States rallied together to end violence and injustice and begin peacemaking. Our unified voices are calling for policy shifts that immediately advance peace, justice, and environmental restoration and protection.”

Six Principles of Nonviolence

communicating with one another

The following article was provided by the nonprofit Metta Center for Nonviolence in California. I am grateful to the Metta Center for describing how each of us can be a leader for nonviolence. – Aggie Perilli

By The Metta Center for Nonviolence

Nonviolence can be a safe, effective and lasting way to defeat injustice, but like any other science it takes knowledge, courage and determination.

Oakland First Friday Protest

Oakland First Friday Protest, June 2015. Credit: Thomas Hawk, via Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Let Nature Be Natural: Green Lawn Care

communicating with nature

The following post was written by Dr. David Dobbins, Emeritus Professor of Plant Anatomy and Development, Morphology, and Horticulture at Millersville University in Pennsylvania. Thank you, David, for describing how chemical-free landscapers and homeowners can restore and protect the environment that sustains all beings. – Aggie Perilli

By Dr. David Dobbins

I grew up in the city of Indianapolis, with little exposure to nature, and had no real interest in the environment. My friends and I burned trash in a barrel, dumped oil and other items down the sewer, and threw garbage into vacant lots. Everyone did.

Open for Sweet Holiday Cheer

Happy Holidays from Aggie Perilli Communications International

Can You Buy Love? Adopt a Pet

APCI holiday classic for our animal friends and the selfless volunteers who rescue them

by Aggie Perilli

The $295 my husband Michael and I paid to adopt a 15-pound Poodle Bichon Frise named Raphie from the Last Chance Ranch Animal Rescue in Quakertown, Pennsylvania, covered the cost of vaccinations, deworming, neutering, and medication for the prevention of kennel cough and other infections. That’s what our veterinarian charges for vaccinations alone.

The Last Chance Ranch had rescued Raphie from a high-kill shelter, where he lay in a fetal position in a far corner of his cage.

Geothermal Townhouses Turn Lawn into Regenerative Woods & Meadows

communicating with nature

by Aggie Perilli

The Grandview Chase Condominium Development (GCCD) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, owns approximately 27 acres of rolling lawns bordered by a field with a stream running through it. Over the past two years, GCCD board members Mark Wiker and I pursued a federal grant to transform GCCD’s unsustainable field of lawn into beautiful, regenerative woods and meadows.

Rewarded for our initiatives, this past spring, the GCCD townhouse association received a grant worth $66,000 from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s (NFWF) Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund to restore GCCD’s riparian buffer with native trees, meadow grasses and rain gardens or, in this field, hundreds of wildflowers.