Inspiring a World of Difference


Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it,
and if I were a bird I would fly
about the earth seeking the successive autumns.
– GEORGE ELIOT

CarolineDesign-Madison-02

Photograph by Caroline Dahlmanns

Aggie Perilli Communications International (APCI) creates award-winning communications, marketing, and information campaigns for non-profit and for-profit interests and organizations. From strategy through customer tracking, APCI engages and aligns your audience to realize your vision while inspiring a world of difference.

Among APCI’s integrated full-service offerings are:

Campaign Nonviolence Advances 1,600+ Peacemaking Actions

Over 1,600 marches, prayer vigils, festivals, and other events took place from September 16 to 24, 2017, across the United States and worldwide, as part of Campaign Nonviolence’s fourth annual “Week of Actions.” These actions culminated on September 21, the International Day of Peace. Thousands participated in this unprecedented grassroots campaign to build a culture of peace free from racism, war, poverty, and environmental destruction.

Said Dr. Ken Butigan, cofounder of Campaign Nonviolence and professor at DePaul University, “People across the United States rallied together to end violence and injustice and begin peacemaking. Our unified voices are calling for policy shifts that immediately advance peace, justice, and environmental restoration and protection.”

Six Principles of Nonviolence

communicating with one another

The following article was provided by the nonprofit Metta Center for Nonviolence in California. I am grateful to the Metta Center for describing how each of us can be a leader for nonviolence. – Aggie Perilli

By The Metta Center for Nonviolence

Nonviolence can be a safe, effective and lasting way to defeat injustice, but like any other science it takes knowledge, courage and determination.

Oakland First Friday Protest

Oakland First Friday Protest, June 2015. Credit: Thomas Hawk, via Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Communication is Essential in a Crisis

communicating with one another

by Aggie Perilli

At a recent gathering of women professionals, an associate asked me to address why communication is especially vital in a crisis, when some might be tempted to turn a blind eye in the hope that no one will notice.

I thought of Johnson & Johnson’s 1982 recall of Extra-Strength Tylenol after seven people died from ingesting capsules that had been criminally tainted with cyanide.

Following this unthinkable crime, Tylenol’s 37 percent of the $1.2 billion analgesic market dropped to 7 percent and marketers predicted that the brand would never recover.